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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 146 (some duplicates have been removed)
with the disconnect that i was alluding to earlier between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental d
and it will be a financial boost for the city. >>> lawrence is out and about with the preview of the bay area science festival. what are you doing? >> oh, yeah. guys, i got to get this plane built. let me tell you, we're working on this really -- oh, i think i just bent the wing. [ laughter ] >> we'll have to do a little redo on that. but we're here enjoining the science festival at the tech museum of innovation. it's a great chance for you to bring the kids down. the whole family. there's something for everyone if you want to do it. it's taking place today and this weekend. so get down here and enjoy it if you want to do that. tell you what the weather is going to be great. we're looking at a lot of sunshine toward the afternoon. just a couple of high clouds drifting by. it's a little chilly in spots. some 40s and 50s. we are looking' patchy fog in the valleys so watch out for that. through the day, that should lift. high clouds will drift through but temperatures will be mild mainly in the 60s and 70s. but you know what? as we look toward the weekend that ridge really taking over. temperatures cou
is playing the science guy. i don't think you're ever coming back, lawrence. >> reporter: no. this is a lot of fun. a lot of kids can come down here and make some really interesting neat stuff. it's all part of a neat science festival they have at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to check it out. they have all kinds of things. this is what they are going to be using to launch some of those planes right here in the lobby and around the tech museum. they have exhibits, imax, real scientists that you can come down and meet and ask them very important questions too. the silicon valley really the center of what has been major innovations that really changed the world. you can come down and meet some of the scientists who have helped to make some of the changes. of course, the weather looking nice now. we are talking about some sunshine coming our way. we're going to need it this morning. it's chilly in spots, low 40s in the north bay valleys, 50s elsewhere, partly cloudy skies. we have a couple of patches of fog and high clouds likely to drift across our skies for today so
much. our next speaker is the co- founder and chief scientific officer of post-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california o
of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. the garden was designed by thoma
to measure in science and engineering when they go to college they're much less likely to get what they call stem degrees in the science and engineering and math degrees if they receive a large preference. a study by friends of mine at the university of virginia found that if you take to students of any color one of whom received a large preferences and one of whom doesn't, the student with a preference has about 40% larger chance of dropping out of science on his path through. the mismatch also affects if with academically inclined students that receive large preferences who with like to become university professors or going to academics sunday, but very predominantly receive low academic grades, clustered at the bottom of the class and decide that academics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experience was in california where the voters passed proposition and we had a large cause i national experiment about what happens when racial preferences are banned from the entire system. the results are extremely clear 21 the bothers. within a half-dozen on the neutrality the number of blacks in
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
of california's death penalty. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler is here with a look. >> reporter: a moral, ethical and economic debate, does the death penalty help protect us? >> reporter: prop 34 would repeal the death penalty. instituting life without parole. retroactive for the 725 right now. a 17% undecided. but a trend just the last two weeks, yes, jumped 4 points to 45%. could prop 34 pass? >> that is unknown at this point but it stands a better chance today than three weeks ago. >> reporter: the cost argument, $100 million a year to keep it. there are strong arguments on both sides. >> what is the right punishment for the evil? it isn't just about the killer. >> it is about public policy. how do we spend, what keeps us safer? >> yes, it is cheaper to lock them up than to execute them. >> we waste a bunch of money either way. >> reporter: our poll found religious differences. catholics favorites it. prodstants oppose it -- pausestants oppose it. the bay area supports repealing the death penalty. southern areas of the state oppose it. don't forget to vote tuesday. health and
by country. >> it is country by country but it is changing. there is a body of science behind this in terms of brain development. if you're not stimulating kids in those early years, and they're not getting the early stimulation they need, we know that their brain does not develop the same way as if they were. that's the same. that's when you have a child in malawi or in california. it's exactly the same science. we're trying to use that science in really pushing for early childhood. and then showing again, programs on the ground that actually demonstrate the effectiveness. in the u.s. we do a lot of early childhood preschool. we then test the kids. we do testing with the children to see where they are in terms of their capabilities. >> cenk: why >> gavin: why haven't we with all that evidence that you point to, we know the best investment the best return is on the front end, not the remedial side. what is it about our educational system or perhaps more importantly our leadership in this country that hasn't started to adjust those dollars or enhance those dollars in the investment. >> that
tonight 10:00 p.m. eastern. but first more "viewpoint" coming right up. politics. >>science and republicans do not mix. >>now it's your turn at the only online forum with a direct line to eliot spitzer. >>join the debate now. >> eliot: we've heard all the promises excuse, smart lines and grotesque misrepresentations. now it's time to choose. the choice is easy. on one hand you have the leader who saved us from sure fiscal di it waster, watched over a recuperating economy preserved our national security and guided our nation's international relations in rough waters insured landmark universal access to healthcare and pushed historic social policy with respect to immigration and civil rights. his challenger is supply-side reagan omics disciple who says he is fit to lead. he says he has a plan but when asked over and over for specifics can't produce. the arithmetic doesn't work. he's a governor who shares the social views he embraced to get to the primaries. he became a meyer pawn of the radical republican party, not a leader of it. on issue after issue the choice couldn't be m
and the budget crisis here at s-j-s-u is dr. charles bullock ... the dean of the college of applied sciences and arts. thanks for joining us .... so dr. bullock, as an educator what stance are you telling your teachers to take in terms of prop 30? what is this school facing if prop 30 doesnt pass? what should students be prepared for or be doing to plan for next semester? can you guarantee that students who are planning to graduate next semester will be able to get the classes that they need? do you remain optimistic about the future of higher education in california and why? thanks for joining us dr.bullock the u-s census bureau says latinos make up one of six residents in the united states. so with the election day less then two weeks away... will the latino vote have an impact (?) update news' pedro garcia shows us the last minute push to register latinos to vote. ">>>on the corner of story and king in east san jose...a group that advocates for immigrant rights...siren attempted to get latinos registered to vote. jeremy barousse/ siren "we are out here registering voters. it's the last da
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
in science and engineering when they go to college they're less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study from the university of virginia found if you take two blacks or students of any color who one receives a large preference and one doesn't, the one that receives preference has a larger chance of dropping out. "mismatch" also affects academically inclined students who receive large preference who like to become university professors or academics. but predominantly receive low academic grades and decide economics is not for them. the biggest "mismatch" experiment was in california where voters passed a proposition with a large experiment of what happened when racial preferences are banned from university systems. it is extremely clear for anyone who played cares to look. within a half-dozen years the number of blacks in the university system has gone up by 30%. the number of blacks receiving a bachelor degrees went up by 70%. the number of degrees for hispanics, gpas of gone up. virtually every outcome has been a dramatic improvement. the colu
help doctors pinpoint those with the highest risk. abc7 news health and science reporter carolyn johnson has a look. >>> normal breaths for now. >> richard was a few strokes from the green when a strange feeling interrupted his round of golf. he knew he was uncomfortable, but the symptoms were vague. >> i got a burning sensation across my chest. it was not a pain. >> now it could be gastrointestinal, it could be their lungs or it could be a heart blockage and my job is listening to them and ferret out more selective symptoms that may pinpoint whether they have heart disease. >> the cardiologist said the goal is to avoid running everybody through tests which are effective but also carry side effects. >> a lot of radiation. ten years of radiation you get in that procedure. >> it includes prescreening patients with a cardio stress test, often involving a treadmill. now a bay area company believes it has an alternative that can help spot which patients are more likely suffering from heart disease more quickly. >> maybe an alcohol pad, bandaid, gauze. >> it was developed by palo alto
health and science reporter carolyn johnson has a look. >>> normal breaths for now. >> richard was a few strokes from the green when a strange feeling interrupted his round of golf. he knew he was uncomfortable, but the symptoms were vague. >> i got a burning sensation across my chest. it was not a pain. >> now it could be gastrointestinal, it could be their lungs or it could be a heart blockage and my job is listening to them and ferret out more selective symptoms that may pinpoint whether they have heart disease. >> the cardiologist said the goal is to avoid running everybody through tests which are effective but also carry side effects. >> a lot of radiation. ten years of radiation you get in that procedure. >> current options includes prescreening patients with a cardio stress test, often involving a treadmill. now a bay area company believes it has an alternative that can help spot which patients are more likely suffering from heart disease more quickly. >> maybe an alcohol pad, bandaid, gauze. >> it was developed by palo alto based cardio dx. it involves a blood draw that can be do
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
is where science meets community. our team does really cutting edge research on different kinds of prevention strategies, pre-exposure prophylaxis. and if you go to our website, join prep hiv, you'll see all of the many exciting studies that we have as well as our partnership with san francisco city clinic in launching the first demonstration project of pre-exposure prophylaxis, taking antihiv medicines to prevent new infections. we're studying topical gels, retro microbicide. the way we're going to end this epidemic is through a vaccine, we've controlled other infectious diseases through a cure. we're proud of our staff who contribute to this as well as the many study participants. and i'm just going to close with a quick word about the project. the way that this project came about was actually one of our staff members, janey vincent who is our graphic designer, you'll see some of her beautiful work inside, noticed that there was -- she's hiding. (applause) >> she noticed that president obama had designated part of his stimulus money to nih for the national institutes of health
that you can. so, we use those kinds of principles that are basically at the heart of a lot of science to be able to do this somewhat miraculous feet producing an accurate representation by just talking with a small fraction. host: are they accurate? guest: well, they are. polling has a very good track record of accurately predicting the elections even though that is not our main purpose. is one way we can know that polls are accurate. in fact, of all the surveys that are done it is one of the only ones that has a very clear outside way to validate all the polsters including the pew will do a final poll and put the estimates out the next week or so before the election and on election day we will find out how accurate we were. four years ago we were within one point of picking the exact mark. eight years ago we were dead on the margin. and we are not the only ones that have a good track record. most polling does a very good job of predicting how the election will turn out. host: how do you a do a poll from the beginning to the end? guest: it is a fairly straightforward process. we do se
has become the blue angels of science. we do lots of stunts, and we are very successful at doing those stunts and we do them at high speeds, and between this project and the project for cal train to electifiy it over the next seven years $3 billion is going to be spent regionally on transit here, and we can say thank you to the secretary of transportation and to the regional transit authorities who have create thursday opportunity for the transportation. >> >> that will create a 22nd century of transit for the tronst century of jobs so thank you to secretary lahood and thank you to the leadership for all that we have accomplished here today. [applause] >> peter rogof was dominated to serve in the federal administration by the department of transportation in 2009 by president barack obama. he has over see the disbursement throughout the country through the american reinvestment act and has done so meeting every milestone established by that act. getting money into hands of transit operators whose budgets were severely strained by the worse economic downturn since our great depre
the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the bards'w ro -- share the bard's words. the garden is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, enjoy the sunshine and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare float you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. shakespeares garden is 8ada accessible. this park is located at the bottom of a hill. it is a secret garden with an infinite and captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, one block from the bottom of lombard street, it makes the top of our list for the most intimate picnic settings. avoid all tourist cars an
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chris convinced the
are in the education program for science or technology and how are we creating jobs in this country and infrastructure and anything like that. so most importantly, how are we fostering innovation in this country, that america, uniquely is founded on the grounds of innovation, we are here in the city where so much that have has happened in so many profound ways. and it seems like every time that we have such disruption in this country. and this time... the financial down turn and the pressure of cyber security and the pressures of so many other things, you know, in... how are we driving innovation forward to champion out of that like we have done over and over and over in the history of this country. in the government, plays a fascinating role in that. i will give you an example of a place that we are doing that, that gets the president excited. and that is when you are thinking differently about the digital assets and in last may... in new york and throughout the very non-governmental place to give a speech, got on stage and talked about fostering this of the 21st century government and the digital go
the shuttle stationed at california science center. it will be on display free of charge. it will be the center piece of the new air and space wing taking about five years to complete. >> i can't wait to see that. >> so much more is ahead on the geents. >> yes. >> oh, my goodness. >> parade coming up on wednesday. >>> we continue to follow a major developing story. home coming of the san francisco giantsful they and world series trophy arrived at at and t park today. we'll take you back there live at 6:00. tonight a new angle on the richmond fire, turns out if chevron has to pay a fine, cities that were hit hardest will not get the money z a story only on abc 7 news tonight. recovery of a young woman who took a tragic fall in yosemite national park. >> world news is coming up next. i'm cheryl jennings. >> from all of us here, thanks for watching we're going live with you great pictures. that is the giants world series trophy and the team arriving back in san francisco a little bit before 4:00 this afternoon. >> look who is holding that. home run king of the series. what a
that lawn science would disappear from the yards and end up in the garbage cans right here. >> supporting candidate jimmy nguyen in city council reyes against incumbent rose publicly claimed he was attacked with a knife early this morning. he says he and two other supporters shot video sunday night matt way lan disposing of a nguyen campaign sign at a park. thaen they showed video he shot and confronted at that same park early this morning disposing of more signs who are you? get away from me. get away from me. >> he then said that i have a knife here. he reached, you know, down below his waist and made the swiping motion. i jumped back. >> way lan said he disposed of signs put on his own lawn that he didn't want in his own trash cans. he claimed he got scraped from being pushed to the ground before being blinded by the camera light sfls i'll admit, i blus herbed. i threatened them. i said i've got a knife. i'm going to -- you better back away from me, you know, no intention of ever doing anything like that. >> based on a complaint from hererer ra, police say an investigation has started.
screens. i was down at the tech museum of innovation today and they are having a science festival so we were doing the whole flew tog thing. that wasn't too bad. you can make your own down there and learn all about the arts and crafts down there making innovative new things. if it doesn't work, there are crashes like mine, just build it again. around the bay area today, we are looking at some sunshine and a few high clouds outside. the temperatures right now not too bad. 62 degrees in concord. 60 in livermore. 61 san francisco. and 61 degrees in san jose. as you head towards san jose, still hazy outside. it's taken a while for low clouds and fog to break up. we are still going to see clouds into the afternoon but motors of that will be high clouds. temperatures cooler at the coast with mild temperatures inland tonight low clouds and fog likely to make a return but what a weekend we have coming our way. cold front trying to move in before the ridge can build in so we are going to see a few high clouds this afternoon and that's it. then this ridge kicks into gear building this for the wee
-berkeley's greater good science center. here researchers study the benefits of feeling gratitude or thankful. >> it really encourages you to think outside of yourself for a moment. >> reporter: research shows individuals who kept a journal and detailed their gratitude were 25% happier than those who did not. >> the people who did the gratitude showed increases in happiness and reductions in stress, reductions in vulnerability, the physical symptoms like headaches, rashes, dizziness. >> reporter: kovack says her boys today are perfectly healthy and that for her family, gratitude plays a big part in their lives. >> at dinner we go around and we each say what we're grateful for. >> reporter: dr. kim mulvihill, cbs 5 healthwatch. >> the center has launched a new gratitude project. anyone can sign up online. for more information go to cbssf.com. click on news and then click on health. and we'll be right back. ,,,,,,,,,, this is hayden. ,,,,,,,,,, that's elizabeth. and that's skyler... and his mom, nancy. they're just a few of the californians who took it on themselves to send you a message about
is experimenting with is a program that dhs science and technology created and if you are ready to write it down, you can look online, you can google it, it's called the next generation incident command system or nics. it's a command and control web-based tool that we're looking with mit lincoln labs and dss and i would foresee when we stand up our wing operation center at miramar that the marine corps liaison and the navy liaison and if need be the guard liaison would have access to that tool. the next generation command system is a fantastic web-based command and control technology that we expect to use in the future. with that, thank you. >> thanks. colonel yeager. >> i just want to say you can't underestimate the risk presented by these environments we fly in and really the relationships that we build with cal fire and the training prepares us to mitigate that risk. as rear admiral riveras said, bad things tend it happen at night. they also happen on the weekend and i think we have a 3-day week jepld here but i assure you we are ready to respond. >> from personal experience in 2007, i
the department of the cleveland clinic. he has directed the transitional science institute's and is the ok.hor of the new boat it is great to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> how will the digital revolution creates a better health care? >> you are used to digitize books and music. how about people? we can get through sequencing once genome. basically everything fed makes you take -- that makes you tick we can change medicine. tavis: give me examples. >> let's say we want to change the cardiogram, and i want to use the smartphone. i have a couple of sensors. i put my finger on the sensor, and i basically have my cardiogram. i can do yours if you would like. if you want to put your fingers on it, there it is. you have a normal heart rhythm. tavis: please tell me that is good. >> you are doing fine. i can look in your heart. i do not need a stethoscope anymore. i am a cardiologists. tavis: how can you be a cardiologists without a stethoscope. >> here is a device where you see everything with high- resolution ultrasound. it is basically the size of a cell phone, and if i want i could
. our site is doing it because their cars get keyed and science get torn down. >> hi, my name is harry. i love your passion and your honesty all these years. i've seen you on media. and david, i admire him so deeply. mainly for that day she was going be campuses and taking them on right there in those places. i was a student in 1965 at kersten university and i was drawn by democrats into democrats into wanting to help take care of people are hearing the clarence thomas hearings, i switched to republican. the >> that's great. >> after the republicans inability to prosecute clinton all the way, i let them and became an independent and decided that was the best place i could find. i loved what you said about the courage of the black conservative. that's the subject i've been drawn to from the very beginning. it was in my heart in those days as a student, when i was in the march to montgomery, where it all got started. >> is this leading to question? >> i have value of my own, too. i wanted you to comment on the person of thomas soul if you don't mind. [applause] >> i think is the greatest
. >> reporter: uc berkeley political science professor lin says voters even now are not paying a great deal of attention to the campaign on tv. sandy could change that. >> this is the kind of news event that will turn voters on. they'll be watching the news, they'll see the candidates but will see obama acting as president. >> reporter: the vice president tried to reenforce that imagine. >> i've never seen a guy so focused. >> reporter: governor romney turned a campaign rally in ohio into a storm relief drive. >> romney is in a tougher situation. he has to appear like he's not campaigning and yet he still needs to be in the news. >> would you eliminate fema if you before president? >> reporter: romney was peppered with questions of his plan to end fema. >> if mistakes are made, people will note them and it could hurt them. >> reporter: what would sandy's impact be on the election pundents on the days after the election. it could take historians months, days or years to truly sort out. >>> more than 100 tenants could be evicted from their floating homes. we'll tell you what the redwood city
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 146 (some duplicates have been removed)